Dead Animal Smell Odor Removal

How To Get Rid of Dead Animal Smell Or Odor

Animals, particularly small rodents are great at smelling and finding entry points into cool or warm houses, crawl spaces, attics, and vehicles. This is why we warn against using poison. Poison works, it kills small animal, and they often die in inconvenient places, i.e  your walls, or other hard or impossible to reach places in your home or office. Sometimes they die in your neighbor’s yard, or your yard and get eaten by a pet, which from time to time causes a pet to die from ingesting a poison filled rodent. We often remove bloated raccoons and opossums from attics that have been feasting on poisoned rats, which can be rare as a homeowner, but something to consider.

You will never eliminate the dead animal smell without removing the dead animal, so if the animal dies 14ft up in your wall next to an ac vent your probably going to smell that animal, (or animals if you use poison) after the animal is removed the smell should start to dissipate and after you sanitize the area even more so.

What not to do when trying to eliminate the odor

First instinct is to shut the door or close off the area to the nightmare that is the smell you smell. Most people shut the door to the room, put a towel under the door and try to keep it confined to that one area. This will work, if you want only that room to smell like a bucket of death. You can go ahead and use your glade plug ins, scented candles, and other such things in you want the room to smell like a seasonal gift basket of death. Let me be really clear about this, there is NO PRODUCT THAT CAN COVER THE SMELL OF A DEAD ANIMAL, but we will tell you how if you keep reading.

  1. Get Rid Of the Carcass Get Rid Of The Smell !  What you do with the body will depend on the local bylaws in your municipality, but your options include burying, burning, and throwing the body in the trash. Don’t touch the animal directly: either wear gloves or use a shovel to move the carcass around.

    • To dispose of the body in the garbage back, remove the insulation or debris that surrounds the carcass, then double bag it before placing it in the trash. Remember to seal your outdoor trashcans because other scavenging animals will get in them to retrieve the dead body for food.

    • You may also be able to call an Dead Animal Removal Service to pick up the body if that sort of thing freaks you out.

    • Clean the area. With gloves on, use a rag or paper towels to pick up any leftover fur, juices, or anything else left behind by the animal. Spray the area with an enzymatic cleaner, which will break down the organic materials and help eliminate odors.

But what if I cant find the dead animal ?

  1. If you can’t locate the animal, buckle up. If the animal died in a very hard to reach place—such as inside a wall—or you may decide to not destroy the finish of your dry wall- whatever the reason is that makes you  unable to remove the carcass to get rid of the odor, keep in mind the time it takes for decomposition and the smell to dissipate will depend on the size of the animal, the temperature, and the humidity.  Be aware that leaving an animal to decompose could take several weeks or even months.

    • Use a strong odor eliminator or disinfectant in the area. You can do this by spraying a product like Bac-Azap, hanging Odor Neutralizing Bags, or using a Neutralizing gel.

    • Replace the bags as necessary and continue using the other neutralizers until the decomposition has finished.

Let It Breathe

  1. Ventilate the area. Whether you’ve removed the source of the smell or you’re waiting it out, ventilation is key to freshening the air and helping eliminate bad odors.

    • Open as many windows as possible

    • Get the air moving

    • Set up a few fans to blow air from inside the house to outside.

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What Exactly Is A Rodent Again

What exactly Is A Rodent Again?
 

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One question we at Rapid Rodent Removal is What exactly is a Rodent? Its A Good question, the name atleast comes from the Latin rodere meaning “to gnaw”) are mammals of the order Rodentia. Rodents which are characterized by a single pair of continuously growing incisors in each of the upper and lower jaws, They use their sharp incisors to gnaw food, excavate burrows, and defend themselves. Most eat seeds or other plant material, but some have more varied diets.

About 40% of all mammal species are rodents; they are found in vast numbers on all continents except Antarctica. They are the most diversified mammalian order and live in a variety of terrestrial habitats, including human-made environments, most notably your attic if you’re reading this.

The Myomorpha, such as the brown rat, have enlarged temporalis muscles, making them able to chew powerfully with their molars. That means they do sound like monster in your attic.From Wiki
 

The suborder Myomorpha contains 1,137 species of mouse-like rodents, nearly a quarter of all mammal species. Included are mice, rats, gerbils, hamsters, lemmings, and voles. They are grouped according to the structure of their jaws and molar teeth. Both their medial and lateral masseter muscles are displaced forward, making them adept at gnawing. The medial masseter muscle goes through the eye socket, a feature unique among mammals. Myomorphs are found worldwide (apart from Antarctica) in almost all land habitats. They are usually nocturnal seed-eaters.

 

 

Not All Rodents are Nocturnal

They Live in my Attic How can they see up there its so dark, and small.  The rodent page on Wikipidea has alot of great information ( http://ift.tt/1HxPOnz ) and touches on this very question.

Rodents, like all placental mammals except primates, have just two types of light receptive cones in their retina, a short wavelength “blue-UV” type and a middle wavelength “green” type. They are therefore classified as dichromats; however, they are visually sensitive into the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum and therefore can see light that humans can not. The functions of this UV sensitivity are not always clear. In degus, for example, the belly reflects more UV light than the back. Therefore, when a degu stands up on its hind legs, which it does when alarmed, it exposes its belly to other degus and ultraviolet vision may serve a purpose in communicating the alarm. When it stands on all fours, its low UV-reflectance back could help make the degu less visible to predators. Ultraviolet light is abundant during the day but not at night. There is a large increase in the ratio of ultraviolet to visible light in the morning and evening twilight hours. Many rodents are active during twilight hours (crepuscular activity), and UV-sensitivity would be advantageous at these times. Ultraviolet reflectivity is of dubious value for nocturnal rodents.

It goes even further to tell you about the social behavior in  the rodent kingdom.

Rodents exhibit a wide range of types of social behavior ranging from the mammalian caste system of the naked mole-rat, the extensive “town” of the colonial prairie dog, through family groups to the independent, solitary life of the edible dormouse. Adult dormice may have overlapping feeding ranges, but they live in individual nests and feed separately, coming together briefly in the breeding season to mate. The pocket gopher is also a solitary animal outside the breeding season, each individual digging a complex tunnel system and maintaining a territory.

Larger rodents tend to live in family units where parents and their offspring live together until the young disperse. Beavers live in extended family units typically with a pair of adults, this year’s kits, the previous year’s offspring, and sometimes older young.[38] Brown rats usually live in small colonies with up to six females sharing a burrow and one male defending a territory around the burrow. At high population densities, this system breaks down and males show a hierarchical system of dominance with overlapping ranges. Female offspring remain in the colony while male young disperse. The prairie vole is monogamous and forms a lifelong pair bond. Outside the breeding season, prairie voles live in close proximity with others in small colonies. A male is not aggressive towards other males until he has mated, after which time he defends a territory, a female, and a nest against other males. The pair huddles together, grooms one another, and shares nesting and pup-raising responsibilities.

Among the most social of rodents are the ground squirrels, which typically form colonies based on female kinship, with males dispersing after weaning and becoming nomadic as adults. Cooperation in ground squirrels varies between species and typically includes making alarm calls, defending territories, sharing food, protecting nesting areas, and preventing infanticide. The black-tailed prairie dog forms large towns that may cover many hectares. The burrows do not interconnect, but are excavated and occupied by territorial family groups known as coteries. A coterie often consists of an adult male, three or four adult females, several nonbreeding yearlings, and the current year’s offspring. Individuals within coteries are friendly with each other, but hostile towards outsiders.

Perhaps the most extreme examples of colonial behavior in rodents are the eusocial naked mole rat and Damaraland mole rat. The naked mole rat lives completely underground and can form colonies of up to 80 individuals. Only one female and up to three males in the colony reproduce, while the rest of the members are smaller and sterile, and function as workers. Some individuals are of intermediate size. They help with the rearing of the young and can take the place of a reproductive if one dies. The Damaraland mole rat is characterized by having a single reproductively active male and female in a colony where the remaining animals are not truly sterile, but become fertile only if they establish a colony of their own.

Since we’re on the topic of it, and the reason that most of you reading this have or have had a rodent infestation, some of the sounds in your attic, is probably them plotting against you.

Communication-Olfactory

Nepotistic species such as house mice rely on urine, feces and glandular secretions to recognize their kin.

Rodents use scent marking in many social contexts including inter- and intra-species communication, the marking of trails and the establishment of territories. Their urine provides genetic information about individuals including the species, the sex and individual identity, and metabolic information on dominance, reproductive status and health. Compounds derived from the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are bound to several urinary proteins. The odor of a predator depresses scent-marking behavior.

Rodents are able to recognize close relatives by smell and this allows them to show nepotism (preferential behavior toward their kin) and also avoid inbreeding. This kin recognition is by olfactory cues from urine, feces and glandular secretions. The main assessment may involve the MHC, where the degree of relatedness of two individuals is correlated to the MHC genes they have in common. In non-kin communication, where more permanent odor markers are required, as at territorial borders, then non-volatile major urinary proteins (MUPs), which function as pheromone transporters, may also be used. MUPs may also signal individual identity, with each male house mouse (Mus musculus) excreting urine containing about a dozen genetically encoded MUPs.

House mice deposit urine, which contains pheromones, for territorial marking, individual and group recognition, and social organization. This can occur in a range of ways:

  • The Bruce effect: Pheromones from strange adult males cause females to terminate their pregnancies
  • The Whitten effect: Pheromones from familiar males cause synchronous estrus in a female population
  • The Vandenbergh effect: Pheromones from mature male house mice cause an early induction of the first estrous cycle in prepubertal female mice
  • The Lee–Boot effect: Pheromones from mature females cause the suppression or prolongation of oestrous cycles of other female house mice (and other rodents) when they are housed in groups and isolated from males
  • Pheromones from males or from pregnant or lactating females can speed up or retard sexual maturation in juvenile females
  • Territorial beavers and red squirrels investigate and become familiar with the scents of their neighbors and respond less aggressively to intrusions by them than to those made by non-territorial “floaters” or strangers. This is known as the “dear enemy effect”.

 

While there is nothing overly special to cause the rodents to choose your yard or house other than nature, remember there is no predation in your attic to control the population, and when left unchecked or treated, sooner or later larger wildlife problems will occur. Call now to set up an appointment, we can handle your issue, or we dont know rat removal.

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What A Rat Infestation Can Do to your Mental Health

What A Rat Infestation Can Do to your Mental Health

Believe me I understand, and no your not crazy, it’s actually pretty common. Rats can be scary, the scratching in the ceiling, or walls, late at night, when it’s dark. But its real something is up there, but stick with me i will make it less scary.

Its commonly called Musophobia :
 

Musophobia is also known as Suriphobia and Murophobia (murine stems from the Muridae family that encompasses mice and rats) .

Musophobia is created by the unconscious as a protective mechanism. This mechanism was probably created as some point in the persons past when they had a traumatic experience with a mouse or rate. Examples of this could be having your house or room invaded by them, finding them eating your food, being surprised when they jump from a trash can, touching them while getting up as they run from under furniture, smelling them, or getting sick from them (The Black Plague in Europe was carried by rats). There are hundreds of ways people could have developed their traumatic experience.

This fear could be triggered by the presence of a mouse or rat in a room or store, seeing them on TV or in movies, someone joking about them, or smelling them. These are only a few possible examples. Everyone experiences their fears in different ways and intensity levels and some react in different ways, such as screaming, running to different rooms, and/or getting to higher ground.

As with any phobia, the symptoms vary by person depending on their level of fear. The symptoms of Musophobia typically include extreme anxiety, dread and anything associated with panic such as shortness of breath, rapid breathing, irregular heartbeat, sweating, nausea, inability to articulate words or sentences, dry mouth and shaking.

Read more about it at http://ift.tt/2npeLgc

 

Musophobia is a very common phobia affecting homeowners throughout the Texas and the rest of the United States. Where some people, keep them as pets, but people with musophobia tend to think they are filthy, disease ridden carriers of death and they smell like pirates. http://ift.tt/2mUpOlB  has this to say about why:

  1. Rats and mice are known carriers of pathogens. They are also infamous in history for spreading the Black Plague which wiped away large chunks of the human population. In general, they are known to dwell in sewers, drainages and dark, wet or dirty places. Rats are also known to carry fleas and other parasites that harm not just humans but pets as well.

  2. Wild rats and rodents are not welcome guests in human homes, so they tend to hide in cracks and crevices found around pantries, kitchens and other places having an abundant storage of food. Naturally, they might spring on unsuspecting individuals and startle them.

  3. Like most animal phobias, the fear of mice also stems, usually, from a negative or traumatic experience with rats. Incidents in childhood where a rat has bitten a child or loved ones can also trigger this phobia.

  4. Humans are conditioned from childhood to fear wild rats and rodents. An adult, parent or caregiver, might have been startled by a rat and screamed or climbed up on a chair. Children unknowingly learn to imitate this behavior and the occasional fright triggers an anxiety response that might turn into lifelong phobia of rats and mice.

  5. Popular culture depicts these creatures in negative light: cartoons (Tom and Jerry), books (Pied Piper of Hamilton), movies, and TV shows etc show stereotypical traits about them. Typically: a rat scares the woman protagonist who jumps and climbs up screaming on a chair/table. (Despite these stereotypes, Musophobia actually affects both genders equally.)

As for the symptoms they conclude: (read full article here)
 

Symptoms of fear of mice phobia

The symptoms of Musophobia vary depending on the extent of fear the phobic experiences. Just like any other Zoophobia, the fear of mice typically triggers physical and mental symptoms which include:

  • Screaming, crying, climbing on beds or tables/chairs

  • Trying to flee

  • Shaking, trembling, and sweating profusely.

  • Having accelerated heartbeat, breathing rapidly or gasping

  • Feeling nauseated, vomiting or having other signs of gastrointestinal distress

Musophobes might experience anxiety/panic attacks at the mere mention of mice, or even from watching them feeding on trash, or in pictures, on TV etc.

There is no question as to if it exist and you are not alone. But as crazy as it sounds, those rats would rather play with you then bite you. We have a great article written about the dangers of them on our website you can read by clicking here.
But if you need rat removal in any of these areas let us know and we will be quick to help as our schedule permits.

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Do I Have A Rodent Infestation ?

Recognizing a Rodent Infestation

Its impossible without some magic glasses to tell you how many rodents are living in your attic or walls, our general rule of thumb is if you have rodent activity in most of your attic we approach it as an infestation.There are many indicators of rodent activity we look for when we perform property inspections, below are some of the more common we see. If you see these throughout your attic, where your likely to have a rat infestation. These same signs can be applied to crawl spaces as well.  We also recommend you read about the health risk of living with rodents, so you understand what your dealing with.

Droppings – Usually, the first clue of a serious rodent problem is their droppings on the kitchen counter, in kitchen drawers and cabinets, or in the pantry. Look for mouse droppings in utility closets, attics, garages and basements. Mouse droppings are smooth with pointed ends, and are 1/8-inch to ¼-inch long. Rat droppings are pellet-shaped, blunt at both ends, about the size of an olive pit, and shiny black. They soon fade to gray-white. Droppings are randomly scattered, but normally close to rodent runways, feeding areas, or near shelter. click here to read our blog to help you identify rodent feces

Tracks – Rodent tracks can be observed in mud, dust or bare dirt. Often, rodent tails also leave a mark. In the house, mouse tracks can be seen on dusty surfaces. You can also check for mouse tracks by dusting suspected areas with a light coating of unscented talcum powder or chalk dust. Wait a day and then shine a flashlight across the area. If there are small tracks in the powder, mice have been there.

Gnawing – Rats must chew continuously to wear down their incisor teeth. Look for holes in walls or ceilings, and trails in crawl spaces, behind or under cupboards, counters, bathtubs, shower stalls, or near hot water heaters or furnaces.

Burrows – Burrows can be found along ditches, walls, or fences, and under buildings, rubbish, low vegetation, woodpiles or concrete slabs.
Runways – Rats follow the same routes as they make their rounds foraging for food each night. In doing so, they leave 2-inch wide runways in the dirt or grass, usually next to buildings or fences.

Grease marks – Greasy rub marks are caused by a rat’s oily fur repeatedly coming in contact with walls or entrance holes.

 

Urine stains – Urine stains are more easily observable under a black light.

Nests – Mouse nests can be found in utility closets, attics, garages, and basements. They are usually made of cloth or shredded paper, lined with finely shredded material. 

Partially eaten food – Mice leave behind partially eaten food. While rats eat most of the food they find, even they leave telltale signs, like shells or other finding.

Live or dead rodents – People usually see mice only when they have been sitting stock still, such as when reading or watching television. Rats are nocturnal, but in areas having large rat populations some low ranked rats will forage during the day, because they have been denied access to food at night. If you see rats during the day, it is a sign of a substantial infestation.

Sounds – While you may not be able to see them, you can probably hear rodents moving after dark. If your pet paws at a wall or cabinet it may be trying to get at a lurking rodent.

Odors – Often you can smell rodent urine or their musky odor, especially in a poorly ventilated room

Just keep in mind, all of these signs may appear in the same areas, or they may be found in separate areas, but finding them in the same or separate areas does not lesson the underlying problem plaguing your house. Rodents breed quickly, and population control is a must in reestablishing rodent control on your property.

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McKinney Rodent Control Services | (972)-435-9000

McKinney Rodent Control Services | (972)-435-9000:

Our Friendly Wildlife Specialists will identify the problem areas while providing customer education. Our Customized Step-by-Step Approach to re-establishing rodent control in and around your home includes Damage Prevention, and Repair Recommendations. We humanely remove animals and follow up on our work.

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Dallas Squirrel Removal Services | (469)-609-7287

Dallas Squirrel Removal Services | (469)-609-7287:

Rapid Rodent Removal is a Dallas Squirrel Removal Service that applies Innovative Environmentally-Responsible Techniques for handling Nuisance squirrel removal problems. Don’t buy into the panic & fear while getting taken advantage of with a one-sized fits all mentality that other companies offer. Ask about our Individualized Squirrel Control Plan today.
website – http://goo.gl/TFrCij
read our 5 star reviews – https://goo.gl/EQichh
facebook – https://goo.gl/NgiD2W

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Dallas Rodent Control Services | Rapid Rodent Removal

Dallas Rodent Control Services | Rapid Rodent Removal:

Our Rodent Control Specialists provide Trapping and Removal, Decontamination Services, and Entry Prevention and Repair at a Lower Price than our Competitors. We are fully Licensed, Bonded, and Insured which allows us to provide Guaranteed Great Customer Service.
Rapid Rodent removal 11245 McCree rd Dallas TX 75238 (469) 609-7287

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Do I Have A Rodent Infestation ?

Recognizing a Rodent Infestation

Its impossible without some magic glasses to tell you how many rodents are living in your attic or walls, our general rule of thumb is if you have rodent activity in most of your attic we approach it as an infestation.There are many indicators of rodent activity we look for when we perform property inspections, below are some of the more common we see. If you see these throughout your attic, where your likely to have a rat infestation. These same signs can be applied to crawl spaces as well.  We also recommend you read about the health risk of living with rodents, so you understand what your dealing with.

Droppings – Usually, the first clue of a serious rodent problem is their droppings on the kitchen counter, in kitchen drawers and cabinets, or in the pantry. Look for mouse droppings in utility closets, attics, garages and basements. Mouse droppings are smooth with pointed ends, and are 1/8-inch to ¼-inch long. Rat droppings are pellet-shaped, blunt at both ends, about the size of an olive pit, and shiny black. They soon fade to gray-white. Droppings are randomly scattered, but normally close to rodent runways, feeding areas, or near shelter. click here to read our blog to help you identify rodent feces

Tracks – Rodent tracks can be observed in mud, dust or bare dirt. Often, rodent tails also leave a mark. In the house, mouse tracks can be seen on dusty surfaces. You can also check for mouse tracks by dusting suspected areas with a light coating of unscented talcum powder or chalk dust. Wait a day and then shine a flashlight across the area. If there are small tracks in the powder, mice have been there.

Gnawing – Rats must chew continuously to wear down their incisor teeth. Look for holes in walls or ceilings, and trails in crawl spaces, behind or under cupboards, counters, bathtubs, shower stalls, or near hot water heaters or furnaces.

Burrows – Burrows can be found along ditches, walls, or fences, and under buildings, rubbish, low vegetation, woodpiles or concrete slabs.
Runways – Rats follow the same routes as they make their rounds foraging for food each night. In doing so, they leave 2-inch wide runways in the dirt or grass, usually next to buildings or fences.

Grease marks – Greasy rub marks are caused by a rat’s oily fur repeatedly coming in contact with walls or entrance holes.

 

Urine stains – Urine stains are more easily observable under a black light.

Nests – Mouse nests can be found in utility closets, attics, garages, and basements. They are usually made of cloth or shredded paper, lined with finely shredded material. 

Partially eaten food – Mice leave behind partially eaten food. While rats eat most of the food they find, even they leave telltale signs, like shells or other finding.

Live or dead rodents – People usually see mice only when they have been sitting stock still, such as when reading or watching television. Rats are nocturnal, but in areas having large rat populations some low ranked rats will forage during the day, because they have been denied access to food at night. If you see rats during the day, it is a sign of a substantial infestation.

Sounds – While you may not be able to see them, you can probably hear rodents moving after dark. If your pet paws at a wall or cabinet it may be trying to get at a lurking rodent.

Odors – Often you can smell rodent urine or their musky odor, especially in a poorly ventilated room

Just keep in mind, all of these signs may appear in the same areas, or they may be found in separate areas, but finding them in the same or separate areas does not lesson the underlying problem plaguing your house. Rodents breed quickly, and population control is a must in reestablishing rodent control on your property.

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